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merlin:

[mp3]

Roderick on the Line - “Ep. 17: Antisocially Promoted”

I honestly thought Roderick could never top, “Then There Was Pump Chili.”

Then, along comes, “Antisocially Promoted.”

Improbably, John has topped himself with “Antisocially Promoted.”

It’s super-frustrating.

Love this guy. 

carlofranco:

Just recently discovered these. This is one of Aled Lewis’ pieces from his Toy Stories series. I recommend checking’em all out. They’re funny as hell.
aledlewis:

Overconfidence

carlofranco:

Just recently discovered these. This is one of Aled Lewis’ pieces from his Toy Stories series. I recommend checking’em all out. They’re funny as hell.

aledlewis:

Overconfidence

poofytoo:

Everytime. ARghhh

poofytoo:

Everytime. ARghhh

americandrink:

At the end of a busy school day, kids need some love from a relaxed, supportive parent. At the end of a busy work day, some of us need a little help to become that parent. Here’s what to do when the closest mixer is a juice box.

Playground Vacation

1 box tropical fruit juice
2 oz. rum

ourpresidents:

Repeal of Prohibition - Elephants and Donkeys Celebrate Over a Barrel of Beer
During his 1932 presidential campaign, FDR promised to end Prohibition. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1921, prohibited the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the United States.
When Roosevelt took office in 1933, a constitutional amendment to repeal Prohibition was already making its way through the state legislatures. Roosevelt acted immediately to ease Prohibition with the Beer-Wine Revenue Act. Passed on March 22, 1933, this act legalized the sale of alcoholic beverages containing no more than 3.2 percent alcohol (this level was declared non-intoxicating). Prohibition was officially repealed by the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933.
This large, glass bowl commemorates the end of Prohibition with a series of seven vignettes imprinted in white, including a “G.O.P.” elephant and a “D.E.M.” donkey celebrating over a barrel of beer.  The etched caption reads, “At Last!”
-From the Roosevelt Library.  More at Today’s Document.

ourpresidents:

Repeal of Prohibition - Elephants and Donkeys Celebrate Over a Barrel of Beer

During his 1932 presidential campaign, FDR promised to end Prohibition. The 18th Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1921, prohibited the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the United States.

When Roosevelt took office in 1933, a constitutional amendment to repeal Prohibition was already making its way through the state legislatures. Roosevelt acted immediately to ease Prohibition with the Beer-Wine Revenue Act. Passed on March 22, 1933, this act legalized the sale of alcoholic beverages containing no more than 3.2 percent alcohol (this level was declared non-intoxicating). Prohibition was officially repealed by the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933.

This large, glass bowl commemorates the end of Prohibition with a series of seven vignettes imprinted in white, including a “G.O.P.” elephant and a “D.E.M.” donkey celebrating over a barrel of beer.  The etched caption reads, “At Last!”

-From the Roosevelt Library.  More at Today’s Document.

You have your folk remedies or your comfort foods or your routine that all help just because they give solace … . But really a hangover is a physical process, or at least the result of one, and there do exist actual remedies that help reverse it.

Best day-after breakfast, according to science: eggs and a tropical smoothie. 

Happy new year, Drinkers. 

(via americandrink)

americandrink:

In the early days of the Dry Era, nobody on the Federal Prohibition Bureau infiltrated and took down more NYC speakeasies than master-of-disguise agent Izzy Einstein and his partner, Moe Smith.

But sometimes it took more than clever deceit to fool a wary bootlegger. Sometimes it took cold,…

beingblog:

A humorous visual for a Christmas morning smile from JamesWhyte:

Merry Christmas! Here’s a Yuletide Venn Diagram for you.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

beingblog:

A humorous visual for a Christmas morning smile from JamesWhyte:

Merry Christmas! Here’s a Yuletide Venn Diagram for you.

~reblogged by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Chanticleer - Magnum Mysterium
850 playsDownload

beingblog:

“Magnum Mysterium” by Chanticleer

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

Fred Child and the producers of Performance Today have created a substantial repository of free music from the live concerts and in-studio performances they broadcast on public radio. This year, three ensembles — Calmus, New York Polyphony, and Chanticleer — are offering free downloads of some of these performances.

I’ll post one track from each group during the course of the day, but I recommend you head over to PT’s website and download them for yourself.

Yamba Conteh, Raka Conteh I, Raka Conteh II, et. al. - A Mare Kone A Borley Pon
221 playsDownload

beingblog:

Tuesday Evening Melody: A Secret Society Song from Sierra Leone

by Nancy Rosenbaum, producer

In Sierra Leone, it’s common for girls to be initiated into secret societies where they spend a period of time in the bush learning traditional cooking, dances, and songs. This week’s selection for our Tuesday evening melody, “A Mara Kone A Borley Pon,” comes from a field recording performed by the initiates of the Bundu society in the town of Tagrin. According to the album’s liner notes, the song’s call and response lyrics translate as:

Oh, my mind has taken me back to my place of origin.
My mind is no longer in this place.
My mind has gone as far as Koya.

In this week’s show “The Art of Peace,” the song punctuates a story that John Paul Lederach tells about his daughter Angela’s work with former female child soldiers in West Africa. We intended this song to illustrate how vibrational drumming and traditional singing can transform traumatic experiences in ways that talking alone doesn’t.

Our original script described the song as “ritual music that comes from the part of West Africa where John Paul Lederach’s daughter, Angie, has worked.” But, this script is too vague and leaves the listener with more questions than answers. It lacks specificity; West Africa constitutes a big swath of geography.

For this week’s broadcast, we added “Sierra Leone” — where Angela Lederach has worked — to this piece of radio script. But we still don’t know the context of this song. How is it actually used in Bundu rituals? What is the translation of the song’s title?

Based on the lyrics, I wonder if the song expresses a longing to revive memories of a flourishing pre-colonial period when the kingdom of Koya reigned. Does anyone have insights about Koya and how it figures into the historical and cultural imagination of Sierra Leone? We’d love your help in deepening our understanding.